Upcoming Events

Next Generation Super-Resolution Microscopy

Tue10
Dec

17:30

Next Generation Super-Resolution Microscopy

Dr Izzy Jayasinghe
17:30, Tuesday 10 December 2019

Adaptations of the next generation of super-resolution microscopy: lessons learnt from imaging intracellular signalling nanodomains.

This talk outlines a decade of research which has utilised s
ingle molecule localisation microscopy to study intracellular ‘nanodomains’ which form the structural units of calcium
signalling seen in muscle cells. Adaptation of chemical photo-switching of aromatic fluorescent labels in the early experiments allowed me and my colleagues to produce paradigm-shifting super-resolution images of nanodomains of the heart over a decade ago. However, over the last few years, there has been a wave of newer super-resolution imaging methods which have transcended the level of spatial detail (resolution) in imaging nanodomains.
We are now able to map the precise positions of the ion channels and regulatory proteins, quantify protein co-clustering at single-protein precision, and identify their individual biochemical signatures.
This talk will detail the adaptation of DNA-PAINT, Enhanced Expansion Microscopy and sandSTORM, techniques which exploit the chemical and material properties of DNA, acrylamide-base hydrogels and fluorescent nano-diamonds in recent experiments which have discovered molecular-scale remodelling of nanodomains in pathologies such as right heart failure.

Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!
CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Public: £2

Past Talks

Directions for Catalysts: Biofuels to Self-Healing Planes

Tue02
Oct

18:15

Directions for Catalysts: Biofuels to Self-Healing Planes

Prof. Duncan Wass
18:15, Tuesday 2 October 2018

Catalysts are the technology at the heart of the majority of industrial chemical processes, their ability to selectively and efficiently convert simple chemical building blocks into more advanced materials being crucial in these processes. This lecture will present two new directions for catalysts from my research group. Firstly, the discovery of catalysts for the upgrading of simple alcohols such as (bio) methanol and ethanol into drop-in replacements for liquid fuels such as petrol will be described. We have extended this technology to be tolerant to real fermentation broths, using alcohols drinks such as beer as a model feedstock. Secondly, we have been working on the development of self-healing carbon fibre reinforced composite materials of the type widely used in aerospace applications. Again, catalysts are the technology at the heart of achieving new materials that can repair themselves with almost full recovery of mechanical properties.

Molecules of Murder

Tue09
Oct

18:15

Molecules of Murder

Dr. John Emsley
18:15, Tuesday 9 October 2018

This talk is about the nefarious molecules with which murderers and assassins have carried out their crimes, hoping always to escape detection. Yet many such deadly molecules have long been known, and many were once widely used by doctors to treat diseases. Murders committed with them posed problems for those who would bring the murderers to justice, and chemists were to provide essential evidence. More recently, secret agents assumed that newer deadly poisons could not be detected, like that used to kill Georgi Markov in London in 1978, Alexander Litvinenko in London in 2006, and Alexander Perepilichny in Weybridge in 2014. It was then up to forensic teams in the UK to discover what they had used.

Urban Water Fingerprinting to Inform of the Environment & Health

Tue16
Oct

18:15

Urban Water Fingerprinting to Inform of the Environment & Health

Dr. Barbara Kasprzyk-Hordern
18:15, Tuesday 16 October 2018

A new approach in public health epidemiology utilizing urban water fingerprinting with hyphenated mass spectrometry techniques has been recently pioneered to provide near real-time measurements of public health. Urban water fingerprinting provides anonymised but comprehensive and objective information on the health status of a population and surrounding environment in real time as urban water (sewerage system and receiving aqueous environment) pools the endo- and exogenous biomarkers of that population.
This cutting-edge approach of extracting epidemiological information from urban water emerged from Wastewater-Based Epidemiology (WBE). WBE was developed in a strong cross-sectoral and transdisciplinary collaborative ethos within SCORE (www.score-cost.eu) and SEWPROF teams (www.sewprofitn.eu), and although still in its infancy, WBE is currently used to report on community-wide illicit drug use trends and feeds into the Europe-wide evidence based early warning system by European Agency for Drugs and Drug Addiction (http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/wastewater-analysis).
This talk will introduce the concept and its rapid advances. It will focus on pharmacologically active compounds in urban water and their stereochemistry in the context of environmental risk assessment. It will also explore new avenues in the utilization of urban water fingerprinting in the assessment of population health and health risk prediction.

Mental Images & Memory Processes as Targets for Cocaine Use

Tue23
Oct

18:15

Mental Images & Memory Processes as Targets for Cocaine Use

Dr. John Marsden
18:15, Tuesday 23 October 2018

Addiction is caused by exposure and physical and mental adaptation. Addiction is treatable; but some disorders have proved resistant to medications and psychological therapies. Focusing on cocaine use disorder (CUD), John Marsden will outline learning processes that underpin and maintain CUD and describe the rationale, procedures, preliminary evidence and implications of a novel cognitive therapy.

Smart Materials

Tue13
Nov

18:15

Smart Materials

Dr. Anna Ploszajski
18:15, Tuesday 13 November 2018

Smart materials allow solid objects to sense, adapt, morph and respond to their environment. Properties like shape and colour become transient upon changes like temperature, light levels, moisture, pressure or magnetism. Many examples of smart materials exist today, but their widespread adoption has been limited. In this talk, award-winning materials engineer Dr Anna Ploszajski will explore why these remarkable materials have proven so difficult to handle, and where we might expect to see them impact our lives in the future.

Mind Reading and Interpersonal Attraction

Tue20
Nov

18:15

Mind Reading and Interpersonal Attraction

Dr. Peter Mitchell
18:15, Tuesday 20 November 2018

Most humans are good at mindreading, meaning that they are adept in interpreting signals in other's behavior to infer the cause of that behavior. The behavior in question has a proximal cause (an inner state, such as something the person is thinking), which in turn is related with a distal cause (an event in the world that triggered them to think of something in particular). The research I will present will demonstrate that people are surprisingly skilled at inferring the distal cause of others' behavior, suggesting by implication that they can infer others' inner states. Some people are easier to "read" than others. Recent evidence suggests that people who are easy to read also tend to be perceived as being likeable or interpersonally attractive.

Age-Related Changes in Synaptic Transmission in Cognitive Design

Tue27
Nov

18:15

Age-Related Changes in Synaptic Transmission in Cognitive Design

Dr. Stephen Brickley
18:15, Tuesday 27 November 2018

Cognitive decline is considered an inevitable consequence of ageing with human brain-imaging studies suggesting that functional changes in connectivity underlies this decline. My laboratory is exploring the hypothesis that cognitive decline is caused by changes in the number and/or the strength of synaptic connections. I will briefly describe the longitudinal behavioural strategies we use to monitor changes in cognitive performance. I will then introduce the automated two-photon imaging and 3D tomography techniques we have developed to trace neuronal connections. Finally, I will discuss the feasibility of combining mGRASP (mammalian GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners) with optogenetics to reveal age-related differences in the synaptic weighting of defined neuronal projections. The aim of this work is to better understand the changes taking place in the brain that could explain the inevitable cognitive decline that is associated with ageing.

Molecules in Space: Our Astrochemical Origins

Tue04
Dec

18:15

Molecules in Space: Our Astrochemical Origins

Dr. Catherine Walsh
18:15, Tuesday 4 December 2018

Molecules are found everywhere in space: in cold and dense clouds in the interstellar medium of galaxies, in planet-forming disks around young stars, and in the atmospheres of hot gas-giant exoplanets. The field of astrochemistry brings together astronomers, physicists, and chemists working on observations, theory, and experiments to increase our understanding of the chemistry that occurs under the extreme conditions in space, and to exploit the information contained within observations that can reveal the chemical, physical, and dynamical properties of astrophysical environments. In this talk I will describe how the origin of complexity seen in our Solar System and that has been exposed in the molecular inventory of comets, has its heritage in the exotic chemistry that happens in the coldest and most quiescent region in space, the interstellar medium. Along the way, I will present results from state-of-the-art space missions and telescopes that are uncovering our astrochemical origins.

Mercury: Window on the Invisible

Tue01
Oct

18:15

Mercury: Window on the Invisible

Professor Andrea Sella
18:15, Tuesday 1 October 2019

Synopsis to come shortly.....

CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Not available to the public.

Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:45 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:15.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!

Stop Thinking Like Chemists & Start Thinking Like Chefs!

Tue08
Oct

18:15

Stop Thinking Like Chemists & Start Thinking Like Chefs!

Ross Campbell
18:15, Tuesday 8 October 2019

For most natural chemicals, the industry focusses on extraction and purification, this is particularly true for food gums or hydrocolloids used as gellants and thickeners in the food business. Ross will review recent work in which CyberColloids has been involved valorising different biomasses to extract appropriate bioactives and produce fibres which can act as label friendly texturants
 
CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Public: Free of charge
Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:45 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:15.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!

How to Discover a New Element

Tue15
Oct

17:45

How to Discover a New Element

Kit Chapman
17:45, Tuesday 15 October 2019

Creating a superheavy element is no easy feat. It's the equivalent of firing six trillion bullets a second at a needle in a haystack, hoping the bullet and needle somehow fuse together, then catching it in less than a thousandth of a second - after which it's gone forever.
Join Kit Chapman as he reveals how the heaviest elements are made and the incredible stories that led to their discovery.
Why did the US Air Force fly planes into mushroom clouds?
How did an earthquake help give Japan its first element?
And where will the periodic table end?

CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Not available to the public.

The Problem With Lab Horror Stories

Tue22
Oct

17:30

The Problem With Lab Horror Stories

Charles Harrison
17:30, Tuesday 22 October 2019

All chemists love telling their health and safety horror stories. Tales of near misses and explosions are a sure fire hit for conferences or impressing other scientists. But with lab safety
more in the spotlight than ever do they do more harm than good?
Charles Harrison will explore the sometimes strained relationship between exciting stories and practical health and safety through his own horror stories and the road to becoming a safety advisor.

Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!
CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Talk available to the public.

Careers Evening

Tue29
Oct

17:30

Careers Evening

Multiple Speakers
17:30, Tuesday 29 October 2019

Annual careers talk where we will hear from 4 professionals in different industries all with a background in Chemistry. Perfect opportunity to get some inspiration for future jobs/internships or to ask questions.
 
Time will be strict so the timetable for the evening will be as follows:
 
17:45-18:00 – tea, coffee and biscuits with SCI sign-up desk set up in Nyholm Room
18:00-18:05 – intro by Anna
18:05-18:15 – Michael Ward (NPL)
18:15-18:25 – Penny Rogers (Science Policy)
18:25-18:35 – Peter Marchand (Patent Law)
18:35-18:45 – Pragna Kiri (Consultancy)
18:45-18:55 – David Witty (SCI Industry)
18:55-19:00 – Questions
 
Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!

Why You Should Care About the Stratosphere

Tue12
Nov

17:30

Why You Should Care About the Stratosphere

Simon Clark
17:30, Tuesday 12 November 2019

The stratosphere is a fascinating place; a lid on the turbulent lower atmosphere, a realm of alien dynamics that defy our everyday experiences, and home to the most violent events in the entire atmosphere. Every now and again the stratosphere reaches down and completely changes the weather we experience on the surface. When the stratosphere comes into town, extreme weather changes lives for many of us. It may well play a key role in the single most dangerous experiment humanity ever attempts. So, in short, you really should understand a bit more about what’s going on up there.

In this talk I will give an introduction to the key features, dynamics, and impacts of the stratosphere. In particular I’ll be discussing sudden stratospheric warmings and their impacts on surface weather, the subject of my PhD, and also the potential use of the stratosphere in geoengineering

Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!
CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Members of the public: £2

The Air That I (actually) Breath: A Look at Air Pollution Indoors

Tue19
Nov

17:30

The Air That I (actually) Breath: A Look at Air Pollution Indoors

Nina Notman
17:30, Tuesday 19 November 2019

Public awareness of urban and other outdoor air pollution is – finally – skyrocketing. But how many of us have every thought about what we inhale indoors where we, on average, do 90% of our breathing? A growing number of air pollution researchers are taking their analytical instruments indoors and measuring exactly what inhabits the air within our homes and other inside environments. In this talk, I will introduce some of these projects and discuss the significance of their findings. I predict that attendees will never look at a toaster in the same dispassionate way again!

Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!

CPS Members: Free of charge
Non CPS Members: £2 charge on the door, or purchase CPS membership at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Members of the public: £2 charge on the door.
DISCLAIMER: If there is a high demand priority will be given to CPS members.

 

Lyocell Fibres – A Sustainable Solution?

Tue26
Nov

17:30

Lyocell Fibres – A Sustainable Solution?

Jim Taylor
17:30, Tuesday 26 November 2019

This lecture is kindly sponsored by the SCI.
 
The presentation will firstly cover the way in which lyocell fibres are manufactured at Lenzing, detailing the solvent spinning system and process detail from wood pulp to finished fibres.
Secondly, it will offer a summary of a Life Cycle Analysis study carried by the University of Utrecht that compares cradle to factory gate comparisons of lyocell with other mainstream
fibres such as cotton and polyester.
The well-known application of lyocell fibre types is in the field of textiles, specifically apparel.
However, the third part of the presentation will cover new and novel industrial applications, for instance replacement of plastics in retail packaging.
Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!
CPS Members: Free of charge
Students: Purchase CPS membership on the door at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Public: Free of charge

One for the Road: What Happens When the Drink-Drive Limit is Lower?

Tue03
Dec

17:30

One for the Road: What Happens When the Drink-Drive Limit is Lower?

Hilary Hamnett
17:30, Tuesday 3 December 2019

In December 2014, the drink-drive limits in both Scotland and New Zealand were lowered to try to reduce road deaths. This talk explains how alcohol and drugs can affect driving and where drink-drive limits come from. It explores what effect the new limits have had on road deaths, and how frequently alcohol and/or drugs were found in these cases before and after the limit change in both countries.
In Scotland, there was an increase in drug prevalence among fatally injured drivers and motorcyclists, with the use of all drug groups increasing after the limit change, with the exception of cannabinoids. In New Zealand, there was a reduction in cases involving drugs only, but increases in the numbers of deceased drivers and motorcyclists positive for alcohol only and co-using alcohol and drugs.
 
CPS Members: Free of charge
Non CPS Members: £2 charge on the door, or purchase CPS membership at £7.50 or £10 with a colour changing mug (valid for your entire degree)
Members of the public: £2 charge on the door.
DISCLAIMER: If there is a high demand priority will be given to CPS members.
 
Meet in the Nyholm Room of Christopher Ingold Building from 17:30 for Tea, Coffee and Doughnuts.
The talk will take place in the Ramsay LT at 18:00.
Join us after the talk for Wine, Cheese and Pizza!